28east

Politics, religion, and culture where East meets West

Posts Tagged ‘Süzme Sözler

Süzme Sözler IV

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From a 1935/6 collection of clever sayings about everything from nationhood to Hitler and Greta Garbo, by Turkish writer Raif Necdet Kestelli:

Dünyayı idare eden tek bir kuvvet vardır: yalan..

In translation:

There is but one force that governs the world: lies.

Süzme Sözler III
Süzme Sözler II
Süzme Sözler I

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Written by M. James

January 9, 2014 at 6:03 pm

Süzme Sözler III

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From a 1935/6 collection of clever sayings about everything from nationhood to Hitler and Greta Garbo, by Turkish writer Raif Necdet Kestelli:

Medeniyet için ne büyük bir leke, ne hazin bir mahrumiyettir ki çok dürüst, çok temiz ve samimî zekâlar hâlâ iyi bir diplomat olamıyorlar!

In translation:

What a great stain on civilization, what a sad deprivation, that very honest, upright, and sincere minds still cannot be good diplomats!

Süzme Sözler II
Süzme Sözler I

Written by M. James

November 16, 2013 at 3:57 pm

Süzme Sözler II

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From a 1935/6 collection of clever sayings about everything from nationhood to Hitler and Greta Garbo, by Turkish writer Raif Necdet Kestelli:

Hassasiyet varlık pınarının kaynağıdır.

Which, in all its simplicity, seems to be an argument for empiricism—that sensations are the basis of all of our knowledge, including knowledge of the self.

In translation:

Sense-perception is the source of the spring of existence.

Paraphrased:

I feel, therefore I am.

Süzme Sözler I

Written by M. James

October 5, 2013 at 1:09 am

Süzme Sözler I

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From a 1935/6 collection of clever sayings about everything from nationhood to Hitler and Greta Garbo, by Turkish writer Raif Necdet Kestelli:

Büyük adamlara en yüksek rütbeyi ve en parlak şerefi devlet değil, millet verir.

Which, as I understand it, is an interesting look at the traditional Turkish regard for what constitutes a devlet as opposed to what constitutes a millet, and which is preferable.

In translation:

The highest distinction and most shining honor for great men is not to bequeath a state, but a nation.

Written by M. James

June 29, 2013 at 9:55 pm

Posted in Culture, Language, Turkey

Tagged with , ,